Diabetic Eye Disease Treatment Mililani, HI

couple

Mililani Diabetic Eye Disease Doctor: Diabetic Retinopathy

Patients with diabetes are at a higher risk for developing eye conditions as a complication their disease. Over 40 percent of patients diagnosed with diabetes develop some form of eye disease as a result of their disease. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and the primary cause of blindness in the United States.

Diabetes can damage blood vessels in the eye, causing blood or fluid to leak from the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. It can also cause new blood vessels to grow on the surface of the retina, leading to significant damage to vision and the overall quality of life.

Diabetic eye disease is a combination of various eye conditions that develop as a result of diabetes. These conditions include:

  • Diabetic retinopathy
  • Cataracts
  • Glaucoma

STAGES OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

There are four distinct stages of diabetic retinopathy. They are:

  • Mild nonproliferative retinopathy – microaneurysms develop in the tiny blood vessels of the retina
  • Moderate nonproliferative retinopathy – blood vessels to the retina become blocked
  • Severe nonproliferative retinopathy – the blood supply to the retina is blocked
  • Proliferative retinopathy – New blood vessels, to replace the blocked blood vessels, grow alongside the retina

During any stage of diabetic retinopathy a condition known as macular edema can develop. Macular edema is the buildup of fluid in the macula, the light-sensitive part of the retina that allows us to see objects with great detail. As the macula swells vision becomes blurred. About half of the people with proliferative retinopathy are diagnosed with macular edema.

SYMPTOMS OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

Early stages of diabetic retinopathy usually do not show symptoms. Treatment is not always required. Patients need to monitor their blood sugar level to prevent the disease from progressing. If the disease does progress, prompt treatment will be necessary to preserve your vision.

Patients who develop diabetic retinopathy may not notice any changes to their vision at first. In its earliest stages, this condition causes tiny areas of swelling in the small blood vessels of the retina.

Symptoms of diabetic retinopathy may include the following:

  • Vision that may be blurry or doubled
  • Flashing lights
  • Blank spots
  • Dark floaters or spots in the vision
  • Pain or pressure in either or both eyes
  • Problems with peripheral vision
  • Severe vision loss or blindness

DIAGNOSIS OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

After a thorough medical examination of the eyes, some of the following diagnostic tests will be conducted to confirm diagnosis:

  • Visual acuity test
  • Dilated eye examination
  • Tonometry test
  • Retinal exam
  • Fluorescein angiogram

TREATMENT OF DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

Other than controlling blood pressure, blood cholesterol and the levels of blood sugar, treatment is not needed during the first three stages of diabetic retinopathy. The fourth stage, proliferative retinopathy is treated with a laser surgery procedure known as scatter laser treatment. During the procedure the abnormal blood vessels are ablated causing them to shrink. This procedure works best once the blood vessels begin to bleed. Severe blood vessel bleeding may need to surgically corrected with a vitrectomy procedure to remove the blood from the eye.

Treatment for macular edema usually includes a laser procedure called focal laser treatment. During this procedure, several hundred small laser burns are placed in the areas of retinal leakage around the macula to prevent leakage from occurring and reduce the amount of fluid in the retina. This helps reduce the risk of vision loss and may improve lost vision in a small number of cases. Focal laser treatment is performed in your doctor’s office and can usually be completed in just one session.

REDUCING THE RISKS OF DEVELOPING DIABETIC RETINOPATHY

Patients with diabetes need to have an annual comprehensive dilated eye exam. The length of time a patient has diabetes will determine the likelihood of developing diabetic retinopathy. Over 40 percent of patients in the United States, diagnosed with diabetes, have a form of diabetic retinopathy.

The risks of developing diabetic eye disease can be minimized by:

  • Monitoring changes in vision
  • Keeping A1C levels under 7%
  • Monitoring and managing blood pressure levels
  • Eating a healthy diet
  • Participating in a regular exercise routine
  • Monitoring and managing cholesterol levels

FINDING THE RIGHT DIABETIC EYE DISEASE TREATMENT IN MILILANI

Finding the right doctor to take care of your diabetic eye disease problems can be extremely tricky. Luckily, Dr. Carlos A. Omphroy has years of experience treating these kind of cases. If you live in the Mililani area, there is no question Dr. Omphroy is the man for the job. Please be sure to give us a call to schedule an evaluation today!

CALL FOR PROFESSIONAL EVALUATION 808.625.5577

Prescription Eyeglasses Mililani, HI

child

Need Prescription Eyeglasses?

More than 140 million people in the United States wear eyeglasses. Eyeglasses improve vision by adjusting the way the eyes bend and focus light. Ideally, light rays are refracted, or bent, as they pass through the cornea so that they focus on the retina in the back of the eye. In a healthy eye, this means that objects can be seen clearly. Most people have corneas that have a shallow or steep curvature which causes light rays to focus in front of or behind the retina. Objects may then appear blurry at certain distances or at all distances.

Glasses can correct these refractive errors. Prescriptions are measured for each eye so patients can enjoy optimal vision clarity, usually 20/20. Eyewear may be used for certain activities, such as reading for farsighted, or hyperopic patients and driving or watching television for nearsighted, or myopic patients, or may be worn at all times.

Regular eye exams test for the development and progression of refractive errors and help your doctor provide a proper prescription if eyeglasses are needed. Exams are also an invaluable tool in the early detection of eye disease.

Retinal Vein Occlusion Treatment Honolulu

woman

The retina is a thin sheet of nerve tissue located in the back of the eye where light rays are focused and transmitted to the brain. Tiny blood vessels supply the retina with oxygen and other nutrients. Arteries deliver blood and the retinal veins carry it. Sometimes one of these arteries hardens or swells and presses on a nearby vein. The vein can then become blocked, or occluded, making it difficult for blood to leave the eye. This condition is called a retinal vein occlusion, or RVO. A retinal vein occlusion is also known as venous stasis retinopathy or hemorrhagic retinopathy. The blocked circulation caused by a retinal vein occlusion can lead to:

  • Swelling
  • Bleeding
  • Growth of abnormal blood vessels
  • Partial or total vision loss

Retinal vein occlusions are the second most common cause of blood vessel-related vision loss, the first being diabetic retinopathy. A retinal vein occlusion typically occurs in men and women over the age of 50, particularly those in their 60s and 70s.

Call Today to Schedule Your Appointment

TYPES OF RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSIONS

Branch Retinal Vein Occlusion (BRVO)

A branch retinal vein occlusion is the blockage of a vein in the inner portion of the eye, where retinal veins “branch out” to smaller veins.

Central Retinal Vein Occlusion (CRVO)

A central retinal vein occlusion is a blockage that occurs in the central or main retinal vein located at the back of the eye.

RISK FACTORS FOR A RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION

Risk factors for a retinal vein occlusion include:

  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Smoking
  • Glaucoma
  • Vitreous hemorrhage
  • Macular edema
  • Inflammatory conditions

SYMPTOMS OF A RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION

Symptoms of a retinal vein occlusion include a sudden loss of vision or blurring of vision in all or a part of the eye.

DIAGNOSIS OF A RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION

A retinal vein occlusion is detected during a retinal exam of the eye. After a thorough medical examination of the eye, the following diagnostic tests may be conducted to confirm the diagnosis of a retinal vein occlusion:

  • Fluorescein angiogram
  • Testing of intraocular pressure
  • Pupil reflex response
  • Slit-lamp examination
  • Visual field testing
  • Visual acuity
  • Retinal photography
  • Blood tests

The initial bleeding can prevent the ophthalmologist from seeing any other symptoms for three to six months or longer. The patient is monitored during this time until the blood clears.

TREATMENT OF A RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION

Treatment of a retinal vein occlusion depends on the severity and location of the blockage. Most patients vision will be restored but their vision is rarely is the same as it was before the occlusion.

There is no cure for a retinal vein occlusion. Emphasis is placed on prevention of the condition by treating the symptoms and preventing further vision loss. A retinal vein occlusion is an indication of vascular disease. It is critical to reduce the risks of vascular disease by adhering to the following guidelines:

  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Stop smoking
  • Eat a diet low in fat
  • Maintaining weight
  • Exercising regularly

COMPLICATIONS OF A RETINAL VEIN OCCLUSION

Complications of a retinal vein occlusion occur and require treatment that may include:

  • Focal laser treatment for macular edema
  • Intraocular injections of an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor
  • Laser treatment to prevent the growth of blood vessels that can cause glaucoma

Services

Cataract Surgery

A cataract is a clouding of the lens of the eye; cataract surgery is performed to improve vision by replacing the clouded lens with an artificial one.

Find out more about Cataract Surgery

Eye Exam

During a comprehensive eye examination, eye diseases or other abnormalities that are not yet causing symptoms can be detected.

Find out more about Eye Exams

LASIK

LASIK, an acronym for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis, is a refractive procedure that reshapes the cornea to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism.

Find out more about LASIK

Multifocal Intraocular Lenses (IOLs)

An intraocular lens, or IOL, is the artificial replacement lens implanted when a patient’s natural lens has been surgically removed during cataract surgery.

Find out more about Multifocal Intraocular Lenses (IOLs)

PRK

Photorefractive keratectomy, or PRK, is a laser vision correction procedure that reshapes the cornea to correct mild to moderate conditions of myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), and astigmatism.

Find out more about PRK

ReSTOR® IOL

AcrySof® IQ ReSTOR® IOL is an intraocular lens that provides a full range of vision for patients after cataract surgery, significantly decreasing their dependence on glasses or contact lenses.

Find out more about ReSTOR® IOL

Tecnis® IOL

The Tecnis Multifocal intraocular lens (IOL) can be used for those patients with or without presbyopia who want to have near, intermediate and distance vision without relying on glasses or contact lenses.

Find out more about Tecnis® IOL

Flashes and Floaters in Eye

couple

Flashes and floaters of the eye are usually the result of age-related changes to the vitreous, which is the thick gel firmly attached to the retina from birth. During the aging process, however, the vitreous becomes thinner and more watery, and at some point pulls away from the retina. This is known as a posterior vitreous separation or detachment (PVD). During PVD, tissue debris that was once secure in the firm vitreous gel loosens and moves around, casting shadows on the retina.

When this occurs, patients experience visual disturbances in the form of flashes of light, or floaters (specks or strands across the field of vision). These symptoms are not typically a reason for undue concern, but should, nonetheless, be evaluated by an ophthalmologist.

CAUSES OF FLASHES AND FLOATERS

Flashes occur as a result of pressure on the retina, the bundle of nerves in the back of the eye where images are detected and transmitted to the brain. Such pressure causes patients to see either flashing lights or lightning streaks. Floaters occur when collagen fibers move across the vitreous and into the field of vision, causing patients to see specks, strands, webs or other shapes as the fibers cast shadows on the retina. Flashes and floaters are most visible when looking at a plain, light background. Beyond simple aging, floaters or flashes appear most often in eyes that are injured, inflamed or nearsighted, and can be a result of the following:

  • Cataract or YAG laser surgery
  • Diabetes
  • Retinitis
  • Nearsighted vision
  • Eye infections
  • A blow to the head
  • Injury to the eye
  • Spasm of small blood vessel

The spasm (sudden constriction) of small blood vessels in the brain is also associated with migraine headaches.

DIAGNOSING FLASHES AND FLOATERS

Most people who develop PVD do not suffer further complications. For a small percentage of people, however, PVD is caused by retinal tears. A retinal tear is quite dangerous because it can lead to retinal detachment, which can seriously threaten vision. A sudden onset of symptoms, or momentary blindness in one section of the field of vision, is cause for concern. Patients who experience either should seek immediate medical attention. Because symptoms may be the same regardless of the cause of the problem, it is important that anyone experiencing unfamiliar disturbances in vision have an examination in which the pupils are dilated; this is the only way in which a retinal tear can be accurately diagnosed. This is one of the reasons that it is crucial for patients to undergo thorough eye examinations on a regular basis. For patients initially diagnosed as having uncomplicated PVD, a small percentage will go on to have retinal tears within 6 weeks, so it is important that they follow up with their doctors. For patients with underlying causative conditions, such as illness or injury, other treatments may be necessary.

TREATMENT OF FLASHES AND FLOATERS

Although flashes and floaters are usually harmless and do not need treatment aside from regular monitoring, patients bothered by disturbances in their vision, or those experiencing significant visual interference, require medical intervention. When treatment is necessary to reduce the appearance of flashes and floaters, it requires surgery to replace the vitreous gel. This procedure, known as a pars plana vitrectomy, removes the natural vitreous and replaces it with fluid. In the case of a retinal detachment, emergency treatment is necessary to prevent serious complications. With treatment, most patients, even those with retinal tears, are able to maintain healthy vision.

Contact Lenses in Mililani, HI

contacts

A contact lens is a thin, convex disc that floats on the surface of the eye, providing vision correction. With advances in optical technology, most people can use contact lenses, regardless of the type or extent of their vision problems. This includes patients with astigmatism, and those who need bifocal or multifocal lenses. In some cases, however, contact lenses are contraindicated.

TYPES OF CONTACT LENSES

There are several varieties of contact lenses. The distinctive features of each offer a wide range of options.

Soft Contact Lenses

There are three basic types of soft contact lenses.

Daily-Wear Lenses

Daily-wear soft contact lenses are the most popular type of contacts available. Made of a flexible plastic polymer, daily-wear lenses are put in each morning and taken out each night. Daily-wear contacts come in many colors and typically last about 1 year.

Extended-Wear Lenses

Extended-wear soft contact lenses can be worn all the time, including while sleeping. Depending on whether a person has 7-day (standard) or 30-day lenses, the lenses need to be taken out and cleaned once a week or once a month. This is done to give the eyes a rest, and reduce the risk of a corneal infection. Extended-wear lenses are made of soft silicone that retains moisture longer than daily-wear contacts. This allows more oxygen to reach the eye, preventing the buildup of bacteria and protein.

Disposable-Wear Lenses

Disposable soft lenses are intended to be discarded and replaced after they have been worn for a certain period of time. This makes them even easier to maintain than regular soft contacts. Many disposable lenses are designed for either replacement every morning, every two weeks or every month. Daily-wear disposables are worn during waking hours only, while extended-wear disposables can be worn during sleep as well.

Choice of lens is based upon doctor recommendation and patient need.

Gas-Permeable Lenses

Rigid, gas-permeable contacts have several advantages, including the following, over soft lenses:

  • Correction of a wider range of vision problems
  • Sharper vision than with most soft lenses
  • More oxygen flow through to the eye, reducing risk of corneal irritation
  • More durability than soft lenses, and less prone to deposit buildup

Because they are much harder than flexible contacts, gas-permeable lenses take some getting used to when they are first worn. They are also more likely than soft lenses to slip off the center of the eye and require adjustment, making them an inconvenient choice for patients who play sports or participate in other vigorous activities. Most patients, however, grow accustomed to the feel of gas-permeable lenses, and are satisfied with the improvement in vision they offer.

Most ophthalmologists offer a comprehensive array of contact lenses to suit their patients’ needs. Prescriptions are required for all contact lenses.

DO’S AND DON’TS OF CONTACT LENS WEAR

Wearing contact lenses is easy and comfortable for most individuals, provided that they follow their doctor’s instructions and care for their lenses. To keep the eyes healthy as a regular contact lens wearer, follow a few basic rules.

  • Attend follow-up appointments on a regular basis
  • Take contact lenses out each night at least one hour before going to sleep unless meant for extended use
  • Do not exceed the recommended time period for wearing contact lenses even if they are not causing any discomfort

Do not wear contact lenses when eyes are painful, red or irritated. Remove the lenses, then clean and store them until the eyes are no longer experiencing these symptoms. If any uncomfortable symptoms return upon renewed use of the contact lenses, make an appointment for an office visit.

Dry Eye Treatment Mililani, HI

eye

Dry eye is a common condition in which the eyes are insufficiently lubricated, leading to itching, redness and pain. The eyes can become dry and irritated because the tear ducts are not producing a sufficient number of tears, or because there is a chemical imbalance in the tears themselves. Natural tears require a particular chemical balance to lubricate the eyes efficiently.

Alleviating the symptoms of dry eye is important. Left untreated, they have the potential to damage vision. Dry eye can be diagnosed after a thorough examination of the eyes, and a Schirmer tear test to evaluate tear production.

CAUSES OF DRY EYE

People usually begin experiencing dry-eye symptoms as they age (they are more common in people older than 50), but they can also result from certain medications, medical conditions or injuries. Dry eye tends to affect women more than men because of the hormonal changes that take place during pregnancy and menopause. Oral contraceptives can also affect the consistency of tears. Other causes of dry eye include the following:

  • Antihistamines, decongestants and blood-pressure medications
  • Rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, Sjögren’s syndrome and thyroid disease
  • Environmental conditions such as smoke, wind or excessive sun
  • Long-term contact lens use
  • Eye injury
  • Eye or eyelid surgery
  • Inflammation of the eye (conjunctivitis or keratitis)

Any of these factors, alone or in combination, can affect the frequency or consistency of tears, either of which can lead to dry eye.

SYMPTOMS OF DRY EYE

The symptoms of dry eye typically occur in both eyes, and include the following:

  • Stinging, burning or scratchiness
  • Eye fatigue
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Difficulty wearing contact lenses
  • Excessive tearing
  • Blurry vision

Dry eye can damage eye tissues, leaving tiny abrasions on the surface that can impair vision. There are, however, many treatments for relieving dry-eye symptoms, restoring eye health and protecting vision.

TREATMENT OF DRY EYE

Treatment for dry eye depends on its cause and severity, as well as the patient’s overall health and personal preference.

Nonsurgical Treatments

Nonsurgical treatments, which include the following, are often effective:

  • Deliberately blinking
  • Increasing humidity levels at home or work
  • Using artificial tears or a lubricating ointment
  • Avoiding environmental irritants
  • Eliminating medications that may be responsible
  • Adding Omega-3 fatty acids to the diet or taking them as supplements

In many cases, simple lifestyle changes can alleviate dry-eye symptoms.

Surgical Treatments

If less invasive methods are unsuccessful, surgical treatments, which include the following, may be an option:

  • Insertion of punctal plugs to limit tear drainage
  • Punctal cautery to permanently close the drainage holes
  • Treatment of an underlying disease

If an eyelid condition is causing dry eye, eyelid surgery may be recommended.

If dry eye is left untreated, it can lead to complications that include pain, corneal ulcers/scars or vision loss.

PREVENTING DRY EYE

There are steps that can be taken to prevent dry-eye symptoms. Simple lifestyle modifications such as wearing protective glasses on windy days, and giving the eyes a break during reading or other tasks that require intense focus, can effectively reduce the frequency and severity of symptoms.

Eye Exam Mililani, HI

exam

Eye Exam Near Honolulu

REGULAR EYE EXAMINATIONS ARE IMPORTANT IN MAINTAINING EYE HEALTH

A comprehensive eye examination can detect eye diseases or other abnormalities that have not yet developed into symptoms. By scheduling an eye appointment now in our Honolulu area office, you are taking the first step to ensure your eyes stay healthy.  Early intervention is crucial in preventing vision loss from a disease such as glaucoma, which may not cause symptoms until significant and irreversible damage has taken place. Early detection of eye problems gives a patient a choice of treatment options and reduces the risk of permanent damage.  Located in Mililani, nearby Honolulu, you can trust Dr. Omphroy and his team to provide a thorough eye examination in a comfortable environment.

Call Today to Schedule Your Appointment

BENEFITS OF A COMPREHENSIVE EYE EXAMINATION

A comprehensive eye exam should be performed once every year. Children should have regular tests to ensure that their vision is normal so that their schoolwork does not suffer. Older adults are at higher risk for eye conditions such as glaucoma, macular degeneration, and cataracts. During a comprehensive eye examination, simple refractive errors are detected, and severe eye problems or diseases, including the following, are diagnosed:
Eye Exam Equipment

  • Amblyopia (lazy eye)
  • Strabismus
  • Eye-tracking difficulty
  • Glaucoma
  • Diabetic retinopathy

Even in younger, healthy adults who are asymptomatic, a regular eye examination is essential. Serious medical conditions, such as high cholesterol, diabetes, and high blood pressure, can be detected, allowing patients to seek treatment early.

THE COMPREHENSIVE EYE EXAMINATION PROCEDURE

A comprehensive eye examination differs from a vision screening. The latter only tests visual acuity and is commonly performed by a school nurse, optician, pediatrician or other healthcare providers.

To evaluate the eyes thoroughly and detect any problems, the following tests are performed:

  • Visual acuity
  • Visual field
  • Retinal examination under pupil dilation
  • Slit-lamp
  • Tonometry (tests intraocular pressure (IOP))
  • Keratometry (measures the curvature of the cornea)
  • Refraction

Tonometry checks for the presence of glaucoma, and keratometry for astigmatism. All of the above tests are safe for all patients.

POSSIBLE TREATMENTS

Based on the diagnostic findings of the examination, eyeglasses or contact lenses, medication for infection or inflammation, vision therapy, and vitamins or other supplements may be recommended. In some cases, eye surgery may be necessary.

COMMON REFRACTIVE ERRORS

The most common eye conditions diagnosed during a comprehensive eye exam involve refractive errors that cause blurry vision. These conditions affect millions of people in the United States and often get progressively worse as patients age. Refractive errors are easily treated.

Myopia

Also known as nearsightedness or shortsightedness, myopia is a condition of the eyes in which nearby objects are clear, and distant objects are blurry. Almost a third of people in the United States have some degree of nearsightedness.

Hyperopia

Also known as farsightedness, hyperopia is a condition of the eyes in which the focus on distant objects is better than the focus on objects closer to the eye, making nearby objects appear blurry. The eye is designed to focus images directly on the surface of the retina; with hyperopia, light rays focus behind the surface of the retina, producing a blurry image.

Astigmatism

Astigmatism occurs when the curvature of the eye is irregular. There are two types of astigmatism: corneal, in which the shape of the cornea (the transparent covering of the eye) is irregular, and lenticular, in which the lens is imperfectly formed. Corneal astigmatism is more common. Astigmatism can result in blurred vision at any distance.

Presbyopia

Presbyopia, meaning “old eye,” is a condition in which the eyes lose their ability to focus on close objects. It is considered a normal part of the aging process. Symptoms typically begin when patients are between 40 and 45 years old.

All of these vision conditions can be effectively treated with either eyeglasses or contact lenses. Corrective lenses may need to be used only during certain activities, such as reading, watching television or driving, or may be required at all times.

Comprehensive eye examinations are essential in checking for vision problems, eye diseases, refractive errors and overall health. How frequently the eyes should be examined is based on the patient’s age and particular circumstances.  Dr. Omphroy proudly serves Mililani, Honolulu and the surrounding areas. Call 808.625.5577 to schedule an appointment today!

When to Have an Eye Exam

An eye exam is a comprehensive analysis of vision and of the overall health of the eye. Using applicable screenings and instruments, Dr. Omphroy assesses the entire ocular structure, front to back in his Honolulu area office. Thorough eye exams can alert you to potential eye diseases, such as retinopathy, macular degeneration, cataracts, glaucoma, and more. Often, eye health is also an early indicator of health conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and stroke risk.

The American Optometric Association estimates that 20 percent of preschool children have vision problems. Eye exams are recommended on the following schedule:
  • First eye exam at 6 months of age, then at 3 years.
  • Before entering elementary school.
  • Every 1 to 2 years thereafter, into adulthood.
  • After age 61, eye exams should be scheduled annually.

What is the cost of an eye exam?

Many people have vision coverage through their employer or other healthcare insurance. Check with your policy for the full extent of benefits. Eye exams range in price from under $100 to over $250. The cost of a full exam differs based on the tests that are needed. When comparing prices, keep in mind that it is better to obtain all care from the same eye doctor. This will cut down on the risk of duplicate screenings. Also, recognize the difference between an optometrist and an ophthalmologist in the ability to diagnose and treat the full range of eye conditions.

 

Eye Exams for Contact Lenses

Patients who wear or are interested in contact lenses should inform their eye doctor of this prior to an eye exam, as additional screenings may be necessary. These include:
  • Cornea measurement using light reflection to discern the curvature of the surface of the eyes.
  • Pupil and iris measurements.
  • Tear film test.
  • Corneal evaluation to determine the health of the eye and detect any changes to the eyes’ surface due to contact lens wear.

Contrast Sensitivity Test

Some patients may be advised to have contrast sensitivity testing. This part of a comprehensive eye exam is similar to vision testing using an eye chart. The difference is that a contrast sensitivity chart will contain alphabetical characters in horizontal lines that become progressively lighter in comparison to the background color. If necessary, special contrast screening devices may be used to evaluate visibility in lower light situations, such as driving at night.

 

Visual Field Test

Visual field testing measures the sensitivity of vision in the various regions of the visual field and also how far the eye can see to each side, and up and down, without moving the head. The measurements that are obtained during this examination enable us to identify early warning signs of glaucoma. Visual field testing may involve computerized instruments or manual screening.

 

Wavefront Eye Exams

You may be familiar with the details of a standard eye exam that revolves around your vision. After observing an eye chart with one eye covered, then the other, you then view that chart through a machine containing lenses of varying strengths. With each lens-change, you determine which offers better visual clarity. The subjective nature of the traditional eye exam leaves a fair amount of room for error. Wavefront eye exams minimize this risk by taking an automated measurement of the refractive errors in the eye.
You are most likely familiar with the traditional vision exams used to prescribe corrective eyewear. The eye doctor uses a machine that contains lenses of different strengths and switches the lenses until the one that produces the best image is found. The results of this exam are somewhat subjective, and are based on what patients think they see rather than what they actually see.

 

What is a Wavefront eye exam?

A Wavefront eye exam is performed to measure a wider range of refractive errors than is possible in a standard exam. The device that is used, an aberrometer, performs an analysis of light refraction through the structures in the eye that achieve focus.

 

Performing Wavefront Eye Exams

The Wavefront eye exam involves looking into the scanning instrument while the chin is resting on a shelf. The device works very quickly to record the path of light through the eye, and to produce a visual map of each that will facilitate the most accurate lens prescription or LASIK treatment plan.
Eye exams performed in our Honolulu area office are anything but basic. Call 808-625-5577 to schedule your visit, or click here to request a consultation

LASIK Near Honolulu

eye

LASIK Eye Surgery Near Honolulu

Dr. Omphroy of Mililani is proud to offer LASIK Surgery to the Honolulu area. Having been in practice for over 30 years, you can trust Dr. Omphroy to provide exceptional, personalized care for the entire process of your LASIK procedure. LASIK, an acronym for Laser-Assisted In Situ Keratomileusis, is a refractive procedure that reshapes the cornea to correct nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. It is the most common type of refractive surgery. Using targeted laser beam energy, the LASIK procedure reshapes the cornea so that light rays are focused more precisely on the retina, producing clear, sharp vision.

Call Today to Schedule Your Appointment

CANDIDATES ELIGIBLE FOR LASIK

LASIK is considered a safe procedure, yet it is not ideal for everyone. A thorough medical evaluation of the patient’s eyes must be performed to determine whether the LASIK procedure is appropriate. Good candidates for LASIK are patients who:

  • Are over 18 years old
  • Not pregnant or nursing
  • In general good health
  • Have had stable vision for at least 6 months
  • Have healthy corneal tissue, thick enough for a flap
  • Have refractive errors that fall within the treatable range

It is also important for patients to fully understand the details and risks of the procedure, and to maintain realistic expectations for the outcome.

What Our Patients Are Saying

“Excellent doctor who is thorough, patient, kind, and most importantly, knowledgeable. He spends the time with you and you don’t feel rushed. He takes his time to explain your concerns and explains your condition patiently.”

BENEFITS OF LASIK SURGERY

One of the primary benefits of LASIK is that patients immediately experience improved vision after surgery. For many people, laser eye surgery can correct their vision sufficiently to permit them to perform all, or most, of their daily activities without eyeglasses or contact lenses. LASIK has the advantage of being a short procedure that results in permanent vision improvement. Most patients who choose to undergo LASIK achieve clear vision without corrective lenses while also benefiting from minimal downtime and only mild post-operative discomfort.

Approximately 90 percent of patients who have undergone LASIK achieve 20/20 to 20/40 vision as a result of the procedure.

HOW DOES LASIK WORK?

LASIK Honolulu HawaiiLASIK is performed on an outpatient basis using only numbing eye drops to reduce any potential discomfort. The entire surgery takes less than 5 minutes to perform, although patients can expect to spend a few hours at the doctor’s office. If requested, patients can receive an oral sedative prior to surgery to reduce any anxieties about the procedure. During the LASIK procedure, the patient lies down in a reclining chair as the doctor positions the laser precisely over the eye. A speculum is used to keep the eye open while the eye is cleaned and anesthetic eye drops are administered. A corneal flap is created with either a blade or a laser. The surgeon gently lifts the surface of the cornea aside, enabling the excimer laser to reshape the curvature of the cornea. The excimer laser delivers customized pulses of light energy based on each patient’s prescription. The measurements for customization are determined prior to surgery, with the precise positioning confirmed prior to the start of the procedure. The second eye is treated immediately after the first. Following the surgery, the patient is provided with a protective shield to protect the eyes from bright lights.

LASIK SIDE EFFECTS

Any surgical procedure carries some risks, and patients should be aware that changes to the cornea made during LASIK cannot be reversed. Nonetheless, LASIK is considered safe for most eligible patients. While rare, complications may occur after the procedure, including:

  • Undercorrection or overcorrection of vision
  • Astigmatism
  • Dry eyes
  • Flap complications
  • Postsurgical infection
  • Increased sensitivity to light
  • Visual problems, such as halos or night glare
  • Fluctuating vision

Only 1 percent of patients undergoing LASIK experience complications.

LASIK RECOVERY TIME

After LASIK, patients rest in the ophthalmologist’s office for a short time before having someone else escort them home. Medication may be prescribed to relieve any discomfort experienced during the first 24 to 48 hours after surgery, but most patients tolerate this procedure well. The doctor will likely recommend a few hours of rest after treatment. Most patients are able to return to work and other regular activities the very next day. Patients who have undergone LASIK are instructed to avoid strenuous activities for at least a week. Typically, patients experience a significant improvement in their vision immediately after the procedure, but the full benefits of LASIK may not be apparent for several months. While patients can achieve clear vision from LASIK, this procedure does not prevent the development of presbyopia, the age-related vision changes that occur after the age of 40. Many patients will need reading glasses for this condition, but their distance vision will remain clear.

HOW MUCH DOES LASIK COST?

We invite you to contact our office to schedule a consultation to see if you are a candidate for LASIK, in which you will receive information for the cost of the procedure.

If you are a candidate for LASIK Eye Surgery near Honolulu or in Mililani HI call us at 808.625.5577

PRK Laser Vision Correction Mililani, HI

EYES

PHOTOREFRACTIVE KERATECTOMY (PRK)

PRK Laser Vision Correction

Photorefractive keratectomy, or PRK, is a laser vision correction procedure that reshapes the cornea to correct mild to moderate conditions of myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), and astigmatism. It is the second most common type of laser eye surgery after LASIK. While during LASIK a flap is created to access the cornea, during PRK the entire epithelial layer of the cornea is removed and later allowed to grow back. During both processes, the cornea is reshaped to provide vision correction.

ADVANTAGES OF PRK

Compared to LASIK, PRK provides the surgeon with greater control over the location and amount of tissue being removed, which permits more precise results. PRK gently sculpts the cornea rather than cuts, maintaining corneal strength while providing impressive vision correction.

Other advantages of the PRK procedure include:

  • Less depth of laser treatment
  • No corneal flap complications
  • Ability to be performed on thin corneas

The PRK procedure offers distinct benefits to individuals whose activities put them at elevated risk of eye injury (boxers, for example) and for patients whose corneas are too thin, or whose pupils are too large, to permit LASIK. PRK also avoids not only the complications from corneal flaps, but a serious complication of LASIK known as corneal ectasia, which can result in distorted vision and even permanent vision loss.

Call Today to Schedule Your Appointment

DISADVANTAGES OF PRK

While PRK may be a preferable to LASIK surgery for some patients, there may be disadvantages to the procedure as well, including:

  • More discomfort for the first few days after surgery
  • Longer recovery period
  • Greater risk of postsurgical eye infection
  • Greater risk of temporary or permanent haziness of the cornea

Both LASIK and PRK have comparable rates of vision improvement and carry some of the same risks, so a serious consultation with the ophthalmologist is necessary to determine which surgery will be most beneficial to the individual patient.

THE PRK PROCEDURE

Before the PRK procedure begins, the eyes are numbed with anesthetic eye drops. The surgeon then uses an excimer laser, with targeted laser energy, to reshape the cornea. The surgeon has complete control over the laser throughout the procedure, for a highly precise and customized result, designed to give each patient the best vision possible. The entire procedure takes only a few minutes to perform. Because of the potential for blurred vision for a time after PRK, the surgery is often performed on only one eye at a time, with the surgeon waiting to schedule the second eye until the vision in the first has adequately cleared.

After the procedure, the eyes are bandaged with a soft contact lens to protect the cornea. New cells will grow back over the next few days to replace the cells that were removed. The contact lens will be removed by the surgeon in a follow-up examination.

RECOVERY AFTER THE PRK PROCEDURE

After the PRK procedure is completed, patients are instructed to rest before returning home. They may required to wear eyeglasses after the procedure until their vision has stabilized. The surgeon prescribes eye drops to prevent infection and keep the eyes moistened.

While vision may improve immediately after the PRK procedure, full results may take several days or weeks to become apparent. Strenuous exercise should be avoided for at least a week because this can interfere with the healing process. Patients will likely be able to see well enough to drive a car after 2 to 3 weeks.

RESULTS AFTER THE PRK PROCEDURE

The results of PRK are considered comparable to those of LASIK. Some patients may experience only 20/40 vision and may still need glasses or contact lenses after their procedure. PRK does not correct presbyopia, a natural change in the eyes that affects people over the age of 40. Patients who require glasses for reading will continue to need them after surgery. It is important for patients to maintain realistic expectations of the results of any laser surgery if they are to be satisfied with the results.

RISKS OF PRK

As with any type of surgery, there are certain risks associated with the PRK procedure, including:

  • Postsurgical infection
  • Adverse reaction to anesthesia
  • Inaccurate vision correction
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Problems with night vision, such as halos
  • Hazy vision
  • Dry eyes

Many of the complications that may arise after PRK are similar to those that may occur after any type of refractive surgery.